Wednesday Weddings — Bass

This is the marriage certificate for my maternal grandparents, William Peter Bass and Madeline (Schoudel) Bishop (“Pap and Gram”), married on October 18, 1941. I love these old marriage certificates, they’re so beautiful.

They were married at St. Willibrod Catholic Church in Roseland. Witnesses were Pap’s sister, Ruth, and her husband Bob Smith. I swiped this photo off of a FB thread, it was taken in 1909. The church was organized in 1900 and located at 114th and Edbrooke.

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Johannes (John) Ooms

Not much is known about Johannes (John) Ooms), my great-great grandfather, who died at the very young age of 26 in 1866. The biography of his son, Adam Ooms states he was a boy when his parents came to America. Here is the passenger list from June 15, 1849 from the ship the “Franziska”, he is 9 years old:

The biography also says John was a veterinarian, and left a wife, Johanna (Van Mijnen), and two young children, Adam and Aggie:

When a young man he studied veterinary surgery with a physician, and practiced at Roseland until his death in 1867.

I have found no other record of his veterinary years, or of himself. As far as his death, there is no record of what he died from and the only record of his burial is from Find a Grave that states he was buried of the churchyard of the First Reformed Church of Roseland. When streets were being put in in that area, all of the remains there were dug up and transferred to Mt. Greenwood Cemetery, this is detailed in a few resources. Many were moved and then in 1910, to use the area for commercial building purposes, an excavating company’s steamshovel starting digging up the area really ruthlessly. After protests, the excavating company removed all the bodies using a shovel by hand and the undertaker of Mt. Greenwood Cemetery supervised the removal to a plot of ground in Mt. Greenwood. I believe this plot is at the front of the cemetery. There may still be bodies buried under 107th Street, according to Find a Grave. Burial records from Mt. Greenwood would have cause of death information for burials, but not from transfers.

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Hans Herr

As I mentioned recently, I’ve been researching my Dorwart line (maternal side). I am working on verifying that I am connected to a man named Hans Herr, this guy here. So far my research is correct, plus I certainly have a lot of DNA matches with his line.

His birth name was Hans Prefiot and he was born in Zurich, Switzerland on September 17, 1639. He became a bishop in the Swiss Brethren (later known as the Mennonites), and was the very first Mennonite bishop to emigrate to America. Because of religious persecution in Switzerland, and then later when he moved to Germany, he and others bought 10,000 acres of land, and colonized a portion of the western frontier of Pennsylvania, which is now Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Eventually they told their families and others that they should come and join them.

He married and had a number of children. There is a question about who his wife really was, and I will be reading about that during my research. How I am connected is through John Dorwart, the son of Martin and Maria (Spitzfadden) Dorwart, my maternal fifth great grandparents. I am not directly related to him as John’s brother George is my connection. But John married into the Herr family. Here’s a schematic to make it easier:

I’ve also seen some Nixdorfs thrown in his family history, so it’s very possible there is a connection through that line of mine.

In 1719, Rev. Herr’s son, Christian, built a stone house that is now known as the Herr House. It is the oldest surviving house in Lancaster County. According to the Herr House Museum’s website, it is also the oldest original Mennonite meeting house still standing in the western hemisphere, as it was also used to serve as a place for worship services. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Here’s one of the inside:

Rev. Herr died on October 11, 1725 in West Lampeter Township, Pennsylvania at the age of 86.

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Dutch Bingo Anyone?

One day last week I received two family history surprises in the mail. One of them was Marlene Cook’s “History and Mystery in First Church Graveyard”, which is a book about the graveyard of the First Church PCA (formerly the First Reformed Church of Lansing), located at the corner of Burnham Avenue and Ridge Road in Lansing, Illinois. Here’s a newspaper article about it.

I met Marlene through the Roseland Facebook thread my father told me about – she introduced herself to me when she saw a thread between myself and someone else (who turned out to be a distant cousin on the Eenigenburg/Ton/Dekker side). Marlene wrote a book about the graves at that cemetery and many of my family members are there, mostly indirect but very important nonetheless. Some of the names are: Schoon, Dekker, Ton, Munster. In fact, it is the same cemetery that Jacob Munster is buried in, who I wrote about before, and the cemetery my father and I were going to visit this spring before COVID-19 became a problematic pandemic. The earliest date found on any tombstone in the cemetery is dated 1864 and is of Grietje Schoon Ton, who is my great-great aunt on my father’s side.

It’s a very interesting read. During our chat, Marlene mentioned her mother was an Ooms and descended from Richard Ooms, another grocer in Roseland – but the “talk” was our grocer guys’ families were not related. Of course you never really know about these things, so I was determined to find out, and I am very happy to say we are truly cousins – distant cousins but cousins nonetheless!!  That’s when I learned about the phrase “Dutch Bingo”, which I didn’t know is a game Dutch people play  when they’re trying to figure out if they’re related to each other. Anyway, it’s really nice to make new friends with cousins I never knew I had. Here’s the shortest version possible of the connection without dates, I’ll write up a longer post later:

Adam Ooms is the son of Jan Ooms and Neeltje Baas, he is my paternal fourth great-grandfather (the grocer Adam Ooms is a great grandson and my great grandfather). Willem (William) Ooms is another son of Jan and Neeltje, so William and my Adam are brothers. William Ooms married Fija (Sophia) Hogendoorn, they had a lot of children, most who died, but there were three surviving children: Jan (John), Gerrit, and Jannigje. John Ooms married Magteltje Huisman, and they had three children: Sophia, William and Richard. Richard is the grocer.


The other thing I received was a death certificate for one of Anna Conner’s children. I’m still trying to track down her maiden name, and track down her parents. This death certificate confirmed what I believe Anna’s maiden name to be: Schadel. The first time I saw the name was on her son Harry’s marriage record, spelled as Shadel. I thought it was a fluke since he was so young when his mother died. But on her son Arther’s death certificate (note last name spelled Conners), her maiden name is listed as Schadel. So I feel pretty confident it is Schadel/Shadel. Census and death certificates list her original country as Germany, so at least I have something to go on but you wouldn’t believe how many Anna Schadel’s were born in Germany around 1872.

I hope you enjoyed my blog post, thanks for reading!

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